Virginia

  SAVE ON CLEARANCE BOOKS

   Buy Any 2 Clearance Items SAVE 25%,  Buy Any 3 SAVE 40%

Discount automatically applied at Checkout

Special offers

Virginia

Virginia

Map Courtesy of Digital-Topo-Maps.com

TVA

Products

A History of Colonial Virginia the First Permanent Colony in America

A History of Colonial Virginia the First Permanent Colony in America. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21386

$4.99

A History of Halifax County Virginia

A History of Halifax County, Virginia. Wirt Johnson Carrington. (1924). This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21375

$4.99

A History of Henry County Virginia

A History of Henry County Virginia. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21374

$4.99

A History of Orange County Virginia

A History of Orange County Virginia. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21372

$4.99

A History of Shenandoah County Virginia

A History of Shenandoah, Virginia. John W. Wayland. (1927). From the Quintin Publications Collection. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-20586

$4.99

A History of St Mark's Parish Culpeper County Virginia

A History of St Mark's Parish Culpeper County Virginia. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21370

$4.99

A Narrative History of Wise County Virginia

A Narrative History of Wise County, Virginia. Charles A. Johnson. (1938). This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21409

$4.99

A New and Comprehensive Gazetteer of Virginia and the District of Columbia

A New and Comprehensive Gazetteer of Virginia and the District of Columbia. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21408

$4.99

Albemarle County, Virginia 1810 Census

Albemarle CO., VA 1810 CENSUS transcribed by John Vogt. 2009, 10 1/2 x 8 1/2, x, 44 pages, illustrations, map, full name index.

153-Albemarle10

$9.95

Allen Allin Allan’s in Virginia Volume I: A-F Counties

Allen Allin Allan’s in Virginia is a compilation (in 4 volumes) of thousands of references found in published sources for persons with the Allen surname and its many variations. The author, Diane Click, has identified these published sources and arranged them by county. Volume 1 contains information for the counties of Accomack, Albemarle, Alleghany, Amherst, Augusta, Bedford, Botetourt, Brunswick, Buckingham, Campbell, Caroline, Charles City, Charlotte, Chesterfield, Clarke, Culpeper, Cumberland, Dinwiddie, Elizabeth City, Essex, Fairfax, Fauquier, Fincastle, Fluvanna, Franklin, and Frederick. Each item is identified by the publication in which it appears, which will allow the reader to find their way to the original record.

For those researching the Allen surname and its many variations, this series will be a great time-saving device.

paperback version

120-D9910

$32.00

$27.20

Allen Allin Allan’s in Virginia Volume III: N-Y Counties

Allen Allin Allan’s in Virginia is a compilation (in 4 volumes) of thousands of references found in published sources for persons with the Allen surname and its many variations. The author, Diane Click, has identified these published sources and arranged them by county. Volume III contains information for the counties of Nansemond, Nelson, New Kent, Norfolk, Lower Norfolk, Northampton, Northumberland, Orange, Page, Patrick, Pittsylvania, Powhatan, Prince George, Prince William, Rappahannock, (Old) Rappahannock, Richmond, Rockbridge, Rockingham, Russell, Scott, Shenandoah, Smyth, Spotsylvania, Stafford, Sussex, Surry, Tazewell, Tyler, Warren, Warwick, Washington, Westmoreland, Wood, Wythe, and York. Each item is identified by the publication in which it appears, which will allow the reader to find their way to the original record.

120-D9917

$37.00

$31.45

Allen Allin Allan’s in Virginia Volume IV: Virginia Records

Allen Allin Allan’s in Virginia is a compilation (in 4 volumes) of thousands of references found in published sources for persons with the Allen surname and its many variations. The author, Diane Click, has identified these published sources and arranged them by county. Volume IV contains information for various record groups of Virginia records. You will find military records, tax records, wills, land records, apprenticeship records, rent rolls, land patents, British records, marriage records, immigration records, and more. Each item is identified by the publication in which it appears, which will allow the reader to find their way to the original record.

120-D9919

$36.00

$30.60

Amelia CO., VA 1810 CENSUS

transcribed by John Vogt. 2004, x, 15 pages, illustrations, map This is the first surviving census for Amelia, since both the 1790 and 1800 censuses have been lost. The original is in a very poor state of preservation; however, the transcriber was able to recover the majority of the faded names, with only six unreadable entries. (The computerized version available on the Web contains 204 out of 608 unreadable entries, along with other transcription errors!).

This and other 1810 censuses are transcribed by the author from the original images, and while many of Virginia's censuses are available online, they oftentimes are replete with misreadings.Caveat emptor!

153-AME10

$9.95

An Old Virginia Court of Franklin County Virginia 1786-1789

An Old Virginia Court of Franklin County Virginia 1786-1789. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21033

$4.99

Annals of Augusta County Virginia

Annals of Augusta County, Virginia, From 1726 to 1871. Waddell, Joseph A.. Staunton, VA. (1902). This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-7966

$4.99

Annals of Southwest Virginia 1769-1800

Annals of Southwest Virginia 1769-1800. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-7964

$4.99

Augusta County,Virginia 1810 Federal Census: A Transcription

John Vogt, 2008, revised 2013 ix, 56 pp., map, illus., arranged by rough alpha letter, 8 1/2 x 11 format, with an every-name index. The census includes separate lists for the rural county census as well as the communities of Staunton, Waynesboro, Greenville, and Middlebrook.
Census returns are some of the first records that a genealogist turns to when studying a new family line. Unfortunately for Augusta County, as well as Virginia as a whole, both the 1790 and 1800 census reports for that state are lost. While the reason for their loss is argued, they nevertheless no longer exist. While personal property tax and land tax lists (which date from 1782) can be used to give some information about individuals, they do not give the researcher a glimpse into family composition or a snapshot of the county as a whole. Hence Augusta’s 1810 census is the first real window we have from the census records of this county which had been first settled in the early eighteenth century and whose original boundaries once stretched beyond the Ohio River. .
With the advent of the computer age and the publication of most of these early censuses, one would expect that many of the genealogist’s problems would be resolved. Unfortunately, this has not happened. While many researchers rely completely upon online census records, these are often flawed by misread names and missing names altogether. The problem is the difficult reading of the documents, which often are written in a tight, cramped hand and with a myriad of possible readings. The close similarity between “S’ and “L,” “F” and “T”, and recognizing the secretarial s, which appears as “ss” in the middle of words but not as an ending, can lead to nightmares in translation. Oftentimes, there is no distinction between an “e”, an “o”, and an “a” unless the reader is familiar with the family names within the document. These are only a few visual issues facing the transcriber. The author has been fortunate to have a professional background in paleography and history, both medieval and modern. In transcribing the current volume, comparison was made with other documents, as well as carefully examining each questionable character under magnification to ascertain the true intent of the writer. In the process, it became apparent that sometimes the census recorder himself was not familiar with strange-sounding German names or heavy Scottish brogues. One spelling would appear in the first encounter with the family, and then later on in the document a different spelling would be given for the same family surname. In brief, computerized lists, while useful, do not give a total and accurate picture of the data. The census was recorded on one hundred folios in a small script, and herein lies the problem with “a”, “e” and “o” in the body of a name. Only by carefully examining the transitions between characters can an accurate reading be obtained.

153-Ag10

$11.00

$8.90

BATH CO., VA 1810 CENSUS

transcribed by John Vogt. 2013, 10 1/2 x 8 1/2, x, 28 pages, illustrations, map, full name index. This is the first surviving census for Bath, since both the 1790 and 1800 censuses have been lost. The transcription is in the order in which the enumerator took his census. Thus, neighbors appear together and this will assist the genealogist. Bath was a county on the western edge of Virginia's Piedmont with the Alleghany Front as its western boundary.

This and other 1810 censuses are transcribed by the author from the original images, and while many of Virginia's censuses are available online, they oftentimes are replete with misreadings.Caveat emptor!

153-Bath10

$9.95

Bedford County, Virginia 1810 Census

transcribed and annotated by John Vogt. 10 1/2 x 8 1/2, x, 47 pages, illustrations, maps. This is the first surviving census for Bedford, since both the 1790 and 1800 censuses have been lost. Bedford was an important county with a heavy slave population (6,147), and the census records a large total population in excess of 16,000. The manuscript itself is in very poor condition.
From the Introduction:

Of ninety-four county and municipal census records for 1810 transcribed to date, Bedford posed the greatest number of challenges in style, readability, condition of the manuscript, and over-all presentation of data. William Key, the assistant marshall and enumerator for the county, chose a unique method of recording the data. Each folio was divided into two columns (cf. Folio 452, page vii), and this allowed 40-45 names to be transcribed per sheet. Unfortunately, there are smaller margins remaining on the left and right, and portions of the edges have fallen away over the centuries. In addition, the manuscript suffered from both water damage and a resultant severe fading along the outside portions. This is especially true for the left-hand column of each sheet, where many of the names are illegible. Finally, in an effort to prevent further deterioration, early archival conservationists placed reinforcing tape along the bottom edges (and occasionally the right edge). In almost every case, the tape is so opaque that the line of data it covered was lost. The two page examples reproduced in the introduction (folios 452 and 453) actually are “good” sheets, and many others were more seriously degraded.

Two unnumbered sheets were discovered in the transcription, the first following folio 457 and the second following folio 458. All of the other sheets, both verso and recto, carry a unique sequence of numbering from 452 through 491. In this transcription the numbers “457R” and “458R” have been assigned to these unnumbered pages.

153-Bd10

$17.95

$14.36

BEDFORD COUNTY, VIRGINIA INDEX TO WILLS FROM 1754 TO 1830

(Published by Heritage Papers, Danielsville, Ga)16 pages.

153-Bdfw

$6.00

Berkeley Co., Va 1810 Census

by John Vogt. 2009, x, 53 pages, map, illustrations
A faithful and accurate transcription of the first surviving census for this Virginia county situated in the north along the Potomac River. Following the Civil war, Berkeley was transferred by Union authorities to West Virginia along with two additional counties in the area.
Misc: An appendix of heads of households for Berkeley in 1820 in index form is included

153-BRY10

$19.95

$15.96

BOTETOURT CO., VA 1810 CENSUS

transcribed by John Vogt. 10 1/2 x 8 1/2, x, 37 pages. This is the first surviving census for Botetourt, since both the 1790 and 1800 censuses have been lost. The transcription is in the rough alpha order of the original document for easy reference. Botetourt was an important and populous county in the mountainous foothills of southwestern Virginia and it was situated along two main thoroughfares westward, the Valley Road and the east-west Buckingham Road from the coast.

This and other 1810 censuses are transcribed by the author from the original images, and while many of Virginia's censuses are available online, they oftentimes are replete with misreadings.Caveat emptor!

153-BT10

$11.00

$8.80

BOTETOURT CO., VA TITHABLES, 1770-1782

transcribed and edited by Karen Wagner Treacy. 10 1/2 x 8 1/2, vi, 170 pages. During the period just prior to the outbreak of the American Revolution and throughout the conflict, a transformation was taking place in the western counties of Virginia, as thousands of settlers moved into and through the area in search of new lands. The records of this period document the very earliest settlers to the area. The author has examined and transcribed the tithables lists for the first dozen years of the county’s existence. From the author’s introduction:

“A tithable was a person who was liable to pay a tax or a tithe, one that was calculated per person, or a ‘head’ tax. A later name for it was poll tax, again meaning per head. The County Court set the amount of the tax to meet the anticipated budget, and authorized the Sheriff to collect the money. This, and not law enforcement, was the most important role of the Sheriff.
Colonial officeholder posted performance bonds for their due and faithful performance. The higher the office, the higher the bond. Most offices required a 500 or 1000 pound bond; the sheriff could be required to post up to 20,000 pounds, enough to cover the tax liability for the entire county.
Who paid the tithe? White males age sixteen to fifty or sixty, and negroes of both sexes and all ages were counted in this head tax. The person ‘taking in’ the lists of tithables also listed number of horses (including stud horses), neat cattle, wheels for riding carriages, and billiards tables, for which the owners also paid a set amount. (Land was taxed separately, although it could be enumerated with the tithables for convenience.). To be removed from the taxable roll, the levy, required an act of the court to acknowledge that a person was aged, infirm, or indigent and ought to be excused.
A county was subdivided into militia districts, headed by captains, and ideally each also had a constable to carry out court-appointed functions. Once a year the court would appoint a person of substance and reputation, often the militia captain, to enumerate the tithables in each district. These lists, turned in to the Botetourt Court on individual slips of paper, served as a yearly census for the heads of households of the county. Often additional tithes in the household were named as well. In cases where a woman was listed as head of household she was not taxed, although sons of age and slaves were. By comparing the documents year to year, we can see sons reaching taxable age, or moving out into their own households. We can see individuals moving from one district to another. People who did not own property and could easily be omitted from other court records (jury duty for example) can be found in the tithable rolls.
Enumerators traveled the county as efficiently as possible. If the list was not reorganized into alphabetical order (often by the first name) we can presume that people listed in proximity lived in proximity. Nicknames, occupations, and parentage were occasionally given to distinguish individuals. Senior and Junior at this period indicated relative age, not necessarily a father and son relationship.
In additon to tax liability, the tithable lists were also featured in an important county service: road maintanence. Each road overseer was empowered to call upon the tithables living in his district to clear and maintain the roads.
These lists from Botetourt County cover the period from 1770 to 1782. Unfortunately, they are only accessible on microfilm, due to the serious fire and water damage suffered by many of that county’s records. Many of the pages are nearly illegible. I have indicated the best readings I could decipher, but I do not pretend to have succeeded in all cases. Because these are copied from microfilm and the originals have been damaged in addition to the degradation of age, some of these readings are very tentative. If I was reasonably sure of a reading (all pages were proofed against the images) I listed the letters I saw. If the name resembled another name existing in these records, I examined the questioned copy to see if the known name would fit the legible penstrokes. If it could be read as the known name that’s how I copied it. Many times I thought a name ‘ought’ to be a known name but I could not see the penstrokes that way; in those cases I listed what I saw. I often noted the original image as being smudged, dark, faded, poor, blotched, or generally bad. In some cases all that could be determined was whether or not individual letters extended above or below the line. Question marks indicate a partially illegible reading that fit the letter pattern of the word. Square brackets indicate an unreadable entry (often these are on creases in the paper) and square brackets within a word indicate one or more letters illegible. The reader should go to the microfilm for any questions about my reading. I have been working with SW VA court records from this period for several years and some of these pages are the most difficult I have encountered."

153-Bott

$27.00

$21.60

Brooke Co. 1815 Directory of Landowners

by Roger G. Ward. 2005. 16 pages, map, 5 1/2X8 1/2.

153-VD11

$5.00

BRUNSWICK CO., VA 1810 CENSUS

transcribed by John Vogt. 10 1/2 x 8 1/2, x, 29 pages, illustrations, map, rough alphabetic listing as in the original. This is the first surviving census for Brunswick, since both the 1790 and 1800 censuses for Virginia have been lost.

This and other 1810 censuses are transcribed by the author from the original images, and while many of Virginia's censuses are available online, they oftentimes are replete with misreadings.Caveat emptor!

153-BRUN10

$9.95

BUCKINGHAM CO., VA. 1870 U.S. CENSUS

transcribed by Jeanne Stinson. 1998. iv, 281 pages, index. Records of this county were burned in 1869. The census lists all persons, both black and white, living in each household, giving name and age, race and sex, occupation of males over 16, value of real estate & personal property, and state or country (and sometimes county) of birth, and age of children born within the census year. Also included is personal information on the individual educational level (read/write, deaf/dumb, attending school, etc.)

153-BK70

$27.00

$21.60

BUCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA 1850 U.S. CENSUS

by Benjamin B. Weisiger, III, 1984. 151 pages, surname index. Records of this county were burned in 1869. The census lists all free persons, black and white, living in each household, giving name and age, occupation of males over 16, value of real estate and state or country (and sometimes county) of birth.

153-BK50

$17.00

$13.60

BUCKINGHAM COUNTY, VIRGINIA 1860 U.S. CENSUS

by Randy Kidd. 1994. vi, 169 pages, index. Records of this county were burned in 1869. The census lists all free persons, black and white, living in each household, giving name and age, occupation of males over 16, value of real estate & personal property, and state or country (and sometimes county) of birth.

153-BK60

$19.95

$15.96

Bulletin of the Virginia State Library Virginia Counties

Bulletin of the Virginia State Library, 1916, Volume 9. (1916). From the Quintin Publications Collection. This is an E-book offered by our partner.

RP-21387

$4.99

CABELL COUNTY, VA 1810 SUBSTITUTE CENSUS [Abstracts from the 1810 Personal Property Tax List]

by John Vogt, 2011, 5 1/2"x8 1/2" format, vi, 7 pages, map.
Cabell is one of eighteen Virginia counties for which the 1810 census is lost. In August, 1814 British troops occupied Washington, DC and public buildings were put to the torch. In the destruction that followed, numerous early records of the government were lost, including all of Virginia’s 1790 and 1800 census reports, as well as eighteen county lists for the state's most recent [1810] federal census. Although two “fair copies” of each county’s census had been left in the counties for public display, these were ephemeral lists and not preserved, and by 1814 they too had been mislaid, lost, or destroyed. Hence, the closest document available we have to reconstruct a partial image of the missing county lists is the personal property tax list.
According to research notes by Minor T. Weisiger, Library of Virginia archivist: “Information recorded in Virginia personal property tax records changed gradually from 1782 to 1865. The early laws required the tax commissioner in each district to record in “a fair alphabetical list” the names of the person chargeable with the tax, the names of white male tithables over the age of twenty-one, the number of white male tithables between ages sixteen and twenty-one, the number of slaves both above and below age sixteen, various types of animals such as horses and cattle, carriage wheels, ordinary licenses, and even billiard tables. Free Negroes are listed by name and often denoted in the list as “free” or “FN.”
The present abstract of Cabell's 1810 personal property tax list is NOT a transcript of the entire document; rather, it is a summary of three items important in delineating the 1810 "substitute" census for this county, i.e., number of male tithables 16 and older, number of slaves twelve years and older, and the number of horses. The original form of the census was in alphabetic order by date and letter. The substitute list presented here is in absolute alphabetic order for easy reference.

153-CBPP

$4.00